Tag Archives: Congress

Of inclusion and prosperity in a global community

Last week I attended commencement exercises at a prestigious university in the nation’s most diverse and creative city. The standard of living between rich and poor is nowhere greater than in New York, and the opportunities for graduates of Columbia … Continue reading

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‘Change’ vs. our ossified process: It’s no contest

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” Martin Luther King’s distillation of abolitionist Theodore Parker’s sermon is one of his most famous quotations. It resonates with us because we assume the universe is moral … Continue reading

Posted in Congress, election campaign, Electoral College, gerrymandering, U.S. Constitution, Voting | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Abraham Lincoln had it pretty good

When our 16th president was inaugurated, seven of the 11 Confederate states had already walked. South Carolina’s secession resolution, like those of other rebellious states, was unambiguous that slavery was the cause: A geographical line has been drawn across the … Continue reading

Posted in Abraham Lincoln, Congress, Supreme Court, U.S. Constitution, Uncategorized, Voting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Which path toward a more perfect union?

I’m glad I don’t vote in Iowa – for a ton of reasons, including I don’t have to make a choice today. Most quadrennials, I’m neutral in the primaries, focused on the end game. Eight years ago I was passionate … Continue reading

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Bert Neuborne and ‘Madison’s Music’

Have you considered why the First Amendment is structured the way it is, or how the 10 amendments of the Bill of Rights came to be so ordered? Me neither, until I read Bert Neuborne’s new book, Madison’s Music: On … Continue reading

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A wake – or awake? – in Baltimore

After riots broke out in cities across the country in the summer of 1967, President Johnson appointed the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. Known as the Kerner Commission after its chairman, Illinois Governor Otto Kerner, it issued a 426-page … Continue reading

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What’s next: equal rights after Indiana

Last week we discovered how far we have come in recognizing the human rights of people who do not identify with sexual norms. As a matter of law, LGBT rights have been ping-ponging between federal and state legislatures and courts … Continue reading

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